Careers

Careers in Skilled Trades and Technology

A Rewarding Career is Waiting for You

Launch a skilled trades career with a college program

If you’re interested in skilled trades and technology, a college program is a great place to start working toward your career. Not only will you learn from experienced tradespeople, you’ll also benefit from a network of industry connections that can lead to apprenticeships and jobs.

Many college trades programs also incorporate apprenticeship training or co-ops so you can complete the in-school requirements of an apprenticeship as part of your program.

Careers that are always in demand

Construction

Construction

Trades focused on constructing and maintaining residential, industrial, commercial, and institutional buildings and infrastructure.

EXAMPLE CAREERS: carpenter, gasfitter, ironworker, crane operator, drywall finisher, metal fabricator.

Industrial

Industrial

Trades related to manufacturing, an incredibly diverse sector of the Canadian economy.

EXAMPLE CAREERS: machinist, electrician, precision machinist, robotics engineer, tool and die maker.

Motive Power

Motive Power

Trades focused on transportation and automotive technology.

EXAMPLE CAREERS: mechanic, heavy duty equipment technician, automotive appraiser, parts service clerk.

Service

Service

Trades that involve working closely with people, often in the healthcare, education, real estate, and retail sectors.

EXAMPLE CAREERS: chef, arborist, registered nurse, child and youth worker.

Technology

Technology

Trades focused on supporting commercial, industrial, and institutional technology needs.

EXAMPLE CAREERS: IT network technician, cybersecurity analyst, controls technologist, software developer. 

Apprentice

Apprenticeships

Apprenticeships provide learners with hands-on training and mentorship opportunities. They can also help learners develop a professional network to support a long and vibrant career.

Emerging careers in the skilled trades

Along with some of the more established fields outlined above, there’s a growing list of new occupations in skilled trades and technology. And while there will always be demand for electricians, carpenters, mechanics, and millwrights, many new types of careers are emerging every day.

This includes:

  • Cybersecurity analyst – identifying and helping address cybersecurity threats like digital fraud and data breaches
  • Mechatronics engineer – designing and fabricating advanced mechanical, thermal, and propulsion systems
  • IT network technician – establishing and maintaining network connections
  • Instrumentation and control technician – installing and maintaining pneumatic, electrical, electronic, and mechanical devices, usually in an industrial environment
  • Horticultural technician – growing and maintaining plants in urban and rural landscapes